Publications

[img] Haswell

When it Rains……. It Swells.

By James McGonigle on June 24, 2020

Elizabeth Haswell, PhD and professor of biology at Washington University in St. Louis and postdoctoral research scholar, Dabarati Basu have discovered the mechanosensitive ion channels in the plant’s cells that respond to swelling by inducing cell death — potentially to protect the rest of the plant. The discovery — reported by Haswell and Debarati Basu, […]

[img] Rebecca Wells

Organ-Level Function on a Chip: Bile Duct-on-a-Chip

By James McGonigle on October 8, 2019

In a recent paper published in Hepatology, CEMB’s Rebecca G. Wells, reports on creating the first bile duct-on-a-chip, making it possible for more-complete research to be conducted without the need for human or animal participants. “Bile ducts pose great challenges to researchers because of their location and their complex function and cellular structure, which has […]

[img] Lucia Strader

Plant Cell Mechanobiology Blossoming at WashU

By James McGonigle on August 14, 2019

Plant biologist Lucia Strader in the School of Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis discovered a cellular transporter that regulates root initiation and progression.  Roots anchor plants in place and allow them to absorb nutrient from soil.  But the process of growing new roots is costly to a plant, and there can […]

Restoring the heart’s elasticity: new path against heart failure

By James McGonigle on July 23, 2018

Ben Prosser, Assistant Professor of Physiology and CEMB faculty researcher and his colleague, Ken Margulies recently reported in Nature Medicine, promising work into restoring elasticity to previously ‘damaged’ and stiff cardiac muscle cells.  The work focuses on the microtubules within a single cardiac cell. Diseased cells fill up with greater numbers of these filaments increasing ...

[img] Rebecca Wells

“Interstitium” may be shock absorber to many organs and tissues

By James McGonigle on April 11, 2018

A system of interconnected, fluid-filled compartments lies below the skin’s surface, lining the digestive tract, lungs and urinary systems, and around arteries, veins, and the space between muscles, according to a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, and the New York University School of […]

myosin video link

Mechanics of Muscle Cells Revealed: Ostap and Sindelar Use Advanced Microscopy to Show Myosin’s Role in Contraction

By Patience on February 27, 2018

The Winter Olympics are dominating news headlines, but how do speed skaters and downhill skiers summon the speed to go for the gold? Muscles – contracting slow and fast – allow these athletes to power through the race and sprint to the finish. The remarkable nanometer-sized cellular machines that drive muscle contraction are called myosins. […]

Arinzeh’s Scaffolds Appear in Sigma Xi Magazine

By Patience on September 15, 2017

Science by CEMB member Treena Livingston Arinzeh of New Jersey Institute of Technology appears in Sigma Xi’s magazine American Scientist, Sept/Oct 2017 edition. Arinzeh’s work with  colleagues Moy and Huang examines how engineered scaffold structures shed light on cell growth, and thus can help “find new ways to regenerate bone, cartilage, and nerve tissue and […]